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20110701
20110731
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the afghanistan strategy and bring home all of the combat truce by the end of next year. also, a conversation with noted british historian and and the four men -- amanda foreman. she has a new book called "a war on fire." >> every community has martin luther king boulevard. that is the cornerstone we all know could is not just a street garble bought, but a place to gather with your community. make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. we are happy to join him to combat illiteracy. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> jeff merkely wrote an op-ed in the new york times on tuesday titled let's not linger in afghanistan. he joins us tonight on capitol hill. thank you for your time. >> is great to be with you. when you say that we are lingering in afghanistan, can you define the word "lingering" for me? >> that means that our mission has been completed. in this case, the mission was to take the taliban out of power in afghanistan, to destroy al qaeda training camps, and to find those responsible for 9
in afghanistan >> ah, yes. and that is a very important part of "the haunting legacy" because chapter 3 with carter and really right up through with reagan and bush one, vietnam and afghanistan have been sort of intellectually married and why do i say that? because zbigniew brzezinski whom you know very well and has undoubtedly many on this program many times, brzezinski when he wasnational security advisor to prident carter, we were very fortunate. we got ahold of hisecret wall streeting memos to carter about what he thought carter ought to do in foreign policy. zbigniew brzezinski actually had in his mind that if we could suck the russians in more deeply into afghanistan we could create what he called heir vietnam." and in his mind, that kind of a loss, soviet troops in humiliation, having to leave afghanistan to go back to the soviet union loaded up with drugs, terrible shape, the equipment absolutely destroyed, they went back and in spig's mind, this could lead to the disintegration of the communist power in the soviet union because the red ar is the core the strength, the inner str
to general petraeus on his way home from afghanistan about america's longest war and other matters. >> nato forces in afghanistan have a new commander. general david petraeus is on the way home. he had been expected to serve longer but has been recalled to head the cia. the force he is leaving behind is now being quicker than he recommended. the insurgency has shown itself capable of hitting back with the assassinations and spectacular attacks. nato insists that they're winning. i asked the general what the possible grounds for optimism could be. >> what we have seen now is developing into a trend. in fact, this past week, yet again the level of insurgent attacks was lower, over 20% lower than the level of attacks in the same week last year. that makes nine of the last 13 weeks in which this has taken place in which the levels of attacks are lower than the corresponding time last year. that is completely contrary to what the intelligence professionals predicted. >> do you think that the strategic level, the death of bin laden, has created any new political possibilities or check political m
is not on the table. in afghanistan, forces have handed over security to the afghan police and the army. the handover ceremony took place with the british officers have been since 2006. this is one area gradually placed under government control. our defense correspondent was at the ceremony and filed this report. >> a moment of national pride. afghans taking responsibility for their own security. this ceremony showing that they are up for the job. but the british soldiers still have concerns, about corruption within the afghan police. >> some allegations of corruption, what we're trying to do is eradicate this. we are trying to push the locals away. >> even if afghanistan routes out the corruption, -- this is another province that was just handed over. there has been little fighting here, over the past 10 years. >> bombs and bullets are not the biggest killers, this is diarrhea and malnutrition. >> after the withdrawal of the nato forces -- >> the pressure is on the government to win the trust of its own people. >> there'll be lots of questions and concerns. our hope is to change that institution. >>
of honor, today for heroism in afghanistan. during a fight in 2008, sergeant first class leroy petry was shot in both legs and lost his right hand when he tried to throw back an enemy grenade. his actions saved two other rangers. president obama presented the medal at a white house ceremony this afternoon. later, outside the white house, petry said all of the troops serving overseas are heroes. >> whenever you have a chance or opportunity to thank them, check them, give them a pat on the back for the job they've done because they've earned it. that's the british award any service member can get is just a simple thank you. >> sreenivasan: petry is the 149th recipient of the medal of honor, and he is only the second living service member to receive one for service in iraq or afghanistan. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: next tonight, an assassination in afghanistan takes the life of the president's half-brother. >> ahmed wali karzai had survived previous attempts on his life but today a family friend finally did what others could not. the provi
of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the new american ambassador to afghanistan was sworn in today and pledged there would be no rush to the exits. ryan crocker takes over as the u.s. begins withdrawing 10,000 troops by the end of the year. he said the u.s. has no interest in using afghanistan to influence neighboring nations. meanwhile, the nato toll in afghanistan grew by one today. an italian paratrooper was killed in an insurgent attack in the west. so far in july, 44 international troops have been killed in afghanistan. the government of syria endorsed a draft law allowing other political parties to form. the move is part of a series of reforms president bashar al assad and his ruling ba'ath party promised in the face of a popular uprising. but the opposition has dismissed the law as largely symbolic. it came as syrian security forces detained more people in damascus and other cities for holding antigovernment protests. the maid who accused former i.m.f. chief dominique strauss- kahn of sexually assaulting her in a manhattan hotel room broke her silence today. nafissa
and afghanistan has made it the focus of al qaeda threat in the past. >> on the surface it is a very unusual target. al qaeda is trying to hit softer, more powerful role targets other than america and britain. >> tonight, soldiers are on the streets of oslo and norway's government is holding crisis meetings. there is shock that the city's peace could be shattered like this. >> and just a brief time ago, president obama spoke about these attacks with the new zealand -- with new zealand's prime minister. >> i want to personally extend my condolences to the people of norway, and it is a reminder that the entire international community has a stake in preventing this kind of terror. we have to work cooperatively both on intelligence and in terms of prevention. >> joining me now to discuss the motivation of who might have been behind the attacks as the former u.s. deputy national security adviser who is currently at the center for strategic and international studies. thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> why would note -- norway bbea target for attacks? >> it is a peaceful country, but it h
afghanistan today. four nato troops were killed in bombings in the east and south. and, eleven afghan policemenç died in separate attacks. amid the killings, general david petraeus-- commander of u.s. and nato troops in afghanistan-- handed over his duties. he is leaving to lead the central intelligence agency. his replacement is u.s. marine corps general john allen. >> it is my intention to maintain the momentum of this campaign, this great campaign on which we have embarked. i will continue to support in every way possible, the recruiting, the training, preparation and equipping and the fielding and the employment of the afghaf oational security forces.ç >> sreenivasan: allen's tenure began just a day after taliban insurgents claimed another high- profile assassination. a close aide to afghan president hamid karzai was killed sunday in a gunbattle at his home in kabul. it followed the murder of karzai's half-brother last week. for more on afghanistan we turn to pam constable, who covers south asia for the "washington post." pam, thanks for being with us. the series of high prof
to step in." you have got to be here. i've been here. i've been doing afghanistan and bin laden and the greek crisis. >> the president says he wants to get working, wants us to get working. i cannot think of a better way than to have him come over today. ng.are waiting sen >> senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. for all the kids were outraged by the president's remarks. -- republicans were outraged by the president's remarks. but harry reid was listening. what you make of the president's performance on wednesday, mark? >> i think the president recognizes two things. over the last two years, democrats lost to the debate on their major initiatives, economic recovery and health care. they don't want to run the risk this time. they have to lay out what the consequences are, the recklessness and irresponsibility of even entertaining the possibility of letting this country defaults on its obligations. >> evan, what do you make of it? >> you cannot be partisan about this. at least he is showing some energy. but he has got to be an arm twister behind the scenes, and he is not really
because of iraq and afghanistan those views are shifting. that invisible wounds, mental wounds, psychological wounds, are just as debilitating and in some cases more debilitating than losing a arm or leg. gwen: what is it about these wars that's different from other wars in changing people's opinions about that? >> part of it is the sheer number of tours. you have people going three, four, five, six times to these war zones. and part of the nature of the war itself. in world war ii, you had big battles where the guys to your left and right of you were shooting at enemies. and it was more of a conventional fight. in iraq and afghanistan, you could be walking as has been the case where i've been there, and a person who's a friend of yours suddenly disappears in an i.e.d. you never see the enemy who took his life. a very different kind of challenge. you are constantly afraid of something bad happening. and you never know who the person is who's doing that bad thing to you or the person you care about. >> yochi, does the policy change affect benefits in a way that needed some deep
to decide on holding a new trial. a suicide bomber in afghanistan killed five people today at a memorial service for ahmed wali karzai-- half-brother of the afghan president. the bomber blew himself up at a kandahar mosque where the service was under way. president karzai was not attending. the attack came as a u.n. report said afghan civilian deaths are up 15 percent from a year ago. officials with the u.n. assistance mission in afghanistan blamed 80% of the killings on insurgents. >> this dramatic growth was mainly due to the use of landmine-like pressure plate, improvised explosive devices or i.e.d.s by the anti-government elements. we at unnama documented 1,462 civilian deaths. >> sreenivasan: nato air strikes -- mainly involving helicopters -- were the leading cause of civilian deaths by international forces. the first american combat forces began leaving afghanistan today as part of a gradual pull-out. army national guard units from iowa boarded a military plane at the bagram airbase terminal. they're among some 1,000 troops set to leave afghanistan this month. last month, presiden
.s. soldiers stationed in southeastern afghanistan held a flag raising ceremony to commemorate the 4th. and at kandahar airfield general david petraeus spent his last independence day as commander of u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan, with the troops. petraeus set to take up his new job as c.i.a. director later this year, today administered the oath of re-enlistment to 235 service members.çç >> you can really feel the honor, especially when you get a general like general petreas come down and do it for us. it makes it really feel a lot more important to me. it'll be nice being able to call home and tell my mom to check it out on tv and be able to tell my family that i got to do this. >> it's just an honor. it's an honor to serve our country. >> woodruff: back in the u.s., presidential candidates are capitalizing on the swell of patriotic spirit. >> happy birthday, america. >> woodruff: both former massachusetts governor mitt romney and former utah governorç john huntsman were in amherst, new hampshire, at a july 4th parade trying to connect with voters. minnesota congresswoman
at 2840. in afghanistan today, president hamid karzai rallied his country's security forces. he warned they face a challenging year ahead, as the u.s. military begins the first part of a phased withdrawal. in the last two weeks, seven areas of the country have been handed over to afghan control. speaking in kabul, karzai told afghan troops they must step up even more, to eventually secure the entire nation by 2014. . >> in the coming three years this transition will be completed. that will be the day when the afghan nation celebrates taking responsibility of security. where afghanistan will be secured by its own people again. its sovereignty will be defended by them and we will defend its integrity. >> sreenivasan: the transition in afghanistan takes place as the pentagon navigates budget cuts. in washington, the nominee for head of the joint chiefs of staff discussed what he called a "new fiscal reality," and warned against tightening the purse strings by too much. president obama has called for $400 billion in military spending cuts over 12 years. during an exchange with republican s
president obama will announce how many troo will bring home from afghanistan beginning next month. the announcement follows months of debate in the white house, it comes with increasing concern in the war andure role in the country. the administration fac a number of challenges at home. unemployment remains high at 9.1%. the housing market continues to suffer and the u.s. debt has surpassed 14 trillion dollars. all of this will pose a significant challenge for the president in the 2012 eltion. joining me now a group of comments from the new york time from washington david brooks, with me here in new york, david leonhardt, roger cohen and tom friedman. they have all won too many awards to talk about. mi pleased to have all of them on this program today to talk about america. what's the challenge for us? because wherever i go around the world the thing they say is tt we want america to take care of their business at home first, so that they can lead the world and pla an important part as the rest of the world changes. >> well, charlie, i think the world does understan that america p
of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: this was a deadly day for nato forces in afghanistan. the alliance announced four troops were killed in two separate attacks in the east. there was no immediate word on their nationalities. 280 nato service members have died in afghanistan so far this year. in syria, security forces and allied gunmen shot and killed 11 people in hama, where residents openly defied the regime of bashar al-assad. activists reported hundreds of people burned tires and erected makeshift barriers to block troops and tanks now encircling the city. in washington, state department spokesman victoria nuland said it is the latest evidence that syria is using "intimidation and arrest" to erase all opposition. >> a week ago the positive example of a city in syria where peaceful demonstrations were allowed, where people were meeting each other and organizing and talking. today we see the town surrounded by syrian security forces so we're going in the wrong direction. >> sreenivasan: in 1982, then- president hafez assad, the current leader's father, crushed a rebelli
imagine getting there in a variety of ways. you count savings from withdrawal of troops, from afghanistan and from iraq. you have some other defense cuts can, you have a whole bunch of discretionary cuts. you do some little things on mandatory programs that are not social security or medicare. and so then the deal gets done and some ofhese big questions on medicare and taxes get saved for the 2012 campaign. on the other hand, whenou read quotes which you occasionally read, from congressional staffers, republican staff are saying, you know, ybe a showdown in whiche don't get this deal isn't the worst thing. that does make you wonder how many people within congress think that actually no deal would be better than a deal. and my colleague david brooks argues that that would be very bad for the republicans politically. i'm not so sure about that. there is only one president and there's only one ecomy and i think there's a chance that chaos and no deal actually hurts the white house and to the extent that the republicans agree with that, then we could be in for a really dicey couple of months.
. we can't expect america with all its economic and other problems and with afghanistan to pull our chestnuts out of the fire. >> rose: but on the question of nato, secretary gates suggested as much. >> rose: indeed. indeed. witness again, you know, a few weeks of military action on a very small scale in libya... >> rose: and all of a sudden... >> and we're running out of munitions and turning back to the united states as the land of last rest. but look, frankly, the military action in libya which i supported, reluctantly but i supported, i actually a sideshow. the big question is can you turn egypt which had been historically at the heart of islamic culture and scholarship into a model and a beacon for threst of the arab world in. >> rose: and your answer is likely? unlikely? too soon to tell? >> look, i mean, there's amaze pog ten nshl egypt and then a highly educated young people, a strong middle-class, a great sense of history and tradition. but it could all go pear shaped between armyn the one hand which is now proving an unam big rouse friend of liberal democracy and the musli
either uploaded or handed off two large data files, the war logs from iraq and afghanistan. >> we don't really know whether manning approached wikileaks or people around wikileaks, or if it was the other way around. but my theory is, whichever way it is, there's an intermediary. there's a group of people in the middle, probably these people in cambridge, massachusetts, who are kind of former computer hackers, many of whom are supporters and are kind of in this loose network of people who support wikileaks. so somewhere in this mix, you have manning with access to this information; you've got wikileaks and julian assange with the desire to get it; and you've got a helpful intermediary. and somewhere in between here, there's a transfer i believe takes place. >> smith: the question of how assange acquired the documents is important. was assange a passive recipient, or was he more involved? >> i think assange is savvy enough that he would have tried to avoid, at all costs, any direct contact with... with bradley manning, understanding that could later lead to a much easier prosecution on
the winding down of military operations in iraq and afghanistan. and, it would give the government an additional $2.7 trillion in borrowing authority to last through 2012. the top republican in the senate mitch mcconnell said democrats were playing with fire by opposing the boehner plan. >> it's inconceivable to me that they would actually block the only bill that could get through the house of representatives and prevent a default right now. it's inconceivable to me that they would do this for no other reason than to help the president avoid another debate before the election about the need for washington to get its fiscal house in order. >> reporter: those words were echoed by many house republicans who took to the floor this afternoon. >> what needs to be done today-- if you owe debts, pay debts. but we also owe a debt to this generation struggling and the next that we can only repay through fiscal reform. >> reporter: house democrats, such as jim mcgovern of massachusetts, had a very different take on the plan. >> i keep expecting lion tamers and acrobats to appear on the house
. military suicides have risen during the long-running wars in iraq and afghanistan. in his statement today, the president said, "these americans served our nation bravely. they didn't die because they were weak." a federal appeals court in san francisco has ordered the military to stop enforcing its ban on gays serving openly. congress repealed the policy last december, but it won't take full effect until the president certifies that the armed services are ready for the transition. it was unclear what effect today's appeals court ruling will have on that timetable. the u.s. capture of a somali suspect triggered a new dispute today over the handling of terror cases. the "new york times" and the "washington post" reported that ahmed abdulkadir warsame was captured in april and held on a u.s. warship, where intelligence officials questioned him for two months. warsame was then flown to new york to stand trial in federal court. but senate repubulican minority leader mitch mcconnell said today he should have been sent to guantanamo and a military tribunal. >> the administration has purposefully
-- you're talking about the debt limits? >> we can talk about afghanistan later. >> life, whatever. well, i don want to get t life. >> now that everydy has sort of worked through their issues and it has become clear that something i think they believed with speaker boehner, but it will come around to something like a $2 trillion package or come up with $2 trillion in vings that will extend the debt limitation. >> that's what the administration believes? that's their revised hope? >> i believe that's true, yes. now, that said, i think that no one involved in this right now really has a good handle on where the boats are and nobody has really seen anyone like that. >> in the congratulate or the implications for this in a political season? >> both. number one i don think anybody knows what can pass right now. because you have -- for example say this 2 trillion-dollar dales. for most democrats it will involve soig medicarend medicaid savings and significant cuts in domestic spending they -- you can't pullhat out of the economy, not the revenues they were hoping for. the overwhelming number o
important than the sergeant in afghanistan? that's a tough decision to make. those are the kinds of choices that have to be made, the kind of contingency plans that the treasury is mapping out today. it really terribly dangerous. >> let me ask you, before i turn to bigger issues, what are the political consequences for the president, for the speaker of the house, and for those republicans who are taking a hard-line in the house of representatives? >> well, i mean, i think the president believes that because public opinion is more on his side than on the republican de, particularly on the shape of a big plan or who has been less willing to compromise, that they feel that almost any outcome is likely to be beneficial to the president politically. i think that when he went on the tv on monday night, his speech was aimed at the independence that the white house is -- independents that the white house is so focused on to convince them he's the reasonable player in this. i'm not sure that that's necessarily the case when we come out of this that he'll benefit politically. i think everybody could
or exceptional drought. a pair of roadside bombs in southern afghanistan today killed at least 19 people, including some children. both blasts went off in helmand province, when a minibus and a tractor struck separate mines. meanwhile in the east, a bomb killed two nato service members. there was no word on their nationalities or the specific location of the attack. thousands of egyptian protesters gathered in cairo's tahrir square today, six months after a popular uprising made the square famous. it was filled with egyptians supporting a variety of political movements, including ultraconservative muslims calling for the implementation of strict islamic law. protestors braved the heat to step up pressure on the country's ruling military council and repeat demands for reform. it was one of the largest crowds to fill tahrir square since president hosni mubarak was ousted from power in february. norwegians paused today for memorial services and the first funerals of the victims of last week's twin attacks. the number of dead was raised to 77. and police said it was likely the self-confessed
.pbs.org. >> lehrer: and again to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the iraq and afghanistan conflicts. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here, in silence, are 11 more. >> brown: and that's the newshour for tonight. on monday, we'll look at the festivities at home and abroad as americans celebrate independence day. i'm jeffrey brown. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online and again here monday evening. have a nice holiday weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsor
of nato. we have forces in international military operations. >> woodruff: afghanistan. >> libya. >> libya, and we are also doing peace facilitation which can make us a target. we have been on sri lanka. we have been in haiti, sudan, lots of places talking to people, which don't necessarily share our views on that. >> woodruff: as you look at these pictures of your home country, what comes to your mind. >> i'm saddened to see the report. you just had here. i live 10 minutes walking distance from the prime minister's office and this is a lively part of oslo and knowing that norway has been attacked by somebody, it's hard to understand, all my friends in norway are still in shock. there will be some hard days to come. and we are not sure how to deal with this at the moment. and there are so many unanswered questions. why did they do this? was he alone. is it part of an international terror organization which the police say is probably not. but how can people go to bed tonight. >> woodruff: well, that's a very good question. how can people go to bed tonight. ahnders tvegard here in washington
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)